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Winter Car Storage

Old 02-27-2008, 03:40 PM
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$110, but they just installed a door with a Keypad and Security system for the building. But for the access to the car in the winter, running water, electricity, a GIGANTIC air compressor, and heat. Its worth it in my mind. Not only that, theres very few places like it. When you see it from the road, you wonder why it hasn't been torn down.
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Old 09-17-2009, 12:02 PM
  #22  
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Thumbs down Winter Car Storage

Since some of us live in areas where theres alot of snow and salt on the roads, during the winter months, I figured this will be a good time to discuss some winter storage tips. I've gone through these tips every year since owning my Tib and never had any issues come the spring time, when pulling it out of hibernation. Feel free to add any additional ones that you all have as well.

I'll add this to the tutorials section also:


1. Remove any faceplate's that have an LCD/OEL screen that can freeze. Even if you store your car in a garage, like I do...it can still get cold enough to cause damage to the faceplates.

2. Park on boards. Don't let your tires sit on cold concrete. Its not that you will develop flat spots by not moving the car, but the concrete will actually absorb the moisture out of the rubber and damage the tire. Its not necesary to put your car on stands. Your car sits on your suspension for years on end, the few months over the winter isnt going to have any impact. The only reason lifting the car is sometimes suggested, is in place of parking on boards.

3. Battery. I know alot of people recommend removing your battery, but thats not necessary if you park it inside a garage. You can if you like, but you can also go and get a small 1 amp trickle charger, and leave it connected and plugged in all winter, without damaging the battery. If your car sits outside and it gets super cold, you might want to remove the battery though so it does not freeze.

4. Fuel stabilizer. When gasoline sits, it can break down and form gum and varnish, which will clog a fuel system. What's more, any moisture left in the system can cause rust. The solution: Add a container of fuel stabilizer to the gas tank, then fill the tank to the top right before putting the vehicle into storage. The short drive home from the gas station will circulate the stabilized fuel throughout the system, keeping the gas fresh and the system safe until the vehicle is ready to ride again.

5. Venting your exhaust. If you decide to fire up your car every 2-3 weeks while its in a garage and you dont want to open the garage door, be sure to attach a dryer vent hose to the exhaust, and vent it outside. Otherwise, your garage and house will fill up with fumes.

6. When you take your car out in the spring, make sure you change your oil. If the oil is due before you store it, change it then, but its only gonna sit for 4 months its not gonna hurt it having 2-3000 mile old oil in it. It's important to remove any acid, moisture and other contaminants from an engine by changing the oil and filter before putting a vehicle to sleep for the winter. It's okay to use the same-viscosity oil as usual, as long as the oil contains corrosion protection.

7. Don't let the cooling system freeze during the winter. Drain the system (including the radiator) and refill it with a rust-inhibiting antifreeze. This isnt super important, but its just a good thing to do as preventative storage maintenance.

8. Protect the paint. Give the vehicle a good washing before it's put away for the winter to remove any road dirt or grime, and be sure to dry it thoroughly, too. Then apply a protective coat of wax. Finally, slip on a breathable cloth car cover. (Plastic covers will trap condensation and provide a fertile breeding ground for rust.)

9. Check the insurance. Just because a vehicle is sitting undriven doesn't mean liability coverage is unnecessary. What if someone pushes the car, and it winds up rolling down the driveway and into the neighbor's brand-new Mercedes? Collision and theft coverage can be important, too.

10. Prevent rust. Unpainted metal surfaces, from engine parts to tailpipes, can use a good coat of rust inhibitor.

11. Protect vinyl, leather and rubber. If the vehicle will be stored in a dry garage, it's still wise to apply a preservative to prevent seats, armrests and dash pads from cracking over time.

12. Provide critter protection. All kinds of small animals find vehicle wiring, seats and carpet delectable, and they think cars and trucks make a nice den, too. So cover up your tailpipes, and any open areas. Especially if you plan on leaving the car outside, during the winter.

13. Make sure the Brake and Clutch master cylinders are full of brake fluid. Brake fluid can absorb water very quickly. By reducing the exposed surface area of the fluid, the water absorption can be reduced. If you can, bleed the brake and clutch systems. It is recommended that you do this on an annual basis anyway, to purge the system of old and possibly contaminated brake fluid.
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Old 09-17-2009, 06:57 PM
  #23  
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Nice, thanks. Im planning on storing the SRT for the winter. I still plan on taking it for short drives when there is no snow or salt on the roads.
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Old 10-22-2009, 08:17 AM
  #24  
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There was a large discussion on RDT regarding this topic

http://www.rdtiburon.com/index.php?showtopic=26018

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Old 10-22-2009, 08:20 AM
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Hey guys....I made a full write up on this topic here:

http://www.hyundaiaftermarket.org/forum/in...showtopic=15604


And here's the tutorial as well, where you can download the MS Word document too:
http://www.hyundaiaftermarket.org/forum/in...ticle&id=50
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Old 04-10-2010, 09:57 PM
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QUOTE
4. Fuel stabilizer. When gasoline sits, it can break down and form gum and varnish, which will clog a fuel system. What's more, any moisture left in the system can cause rust. The solution: Add a container of fuel stabilizer to the gas tank, then fill the tank to the top right before putting the vehicle into storage. The short drive home from the gas station will circulate the stabilized fuel throughout the system, keeping the gas fresh and the system safe until the vehicle is ready to ride again.


I recommend Startron (available at Walmart in the marine/boating section). http://www.startron.com/

Been using it in my car, lawnmower, etc... it is a great product for gas that is going to sit for 3-6 months...
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Old 10-17-2012, 09:23 PM
  #27  
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for those who store their cars in the winter...
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